Building Bridges Between Institutions – Part 3

Employers report that new workers entering the workforce often do not have the skills required to fulfill the terms of their employment. In addition, much of the existing workforce requires retraining to update their skills so companies can continue to compete in the changing economy. Educational institutions and local employers would benefit from a closer working relationship. We are pleased to participate in organizing is the EduTech trade show, scheduled for the fall, which will do exactly that – provide a direct link between Peninsula employers, educators and students. (more…)

2017 Crystal Awards Nomination

Award Criteria by Category
  • Business of the Year Award: 1 - 15 Employees

    Applicants in this category must demonstrate:

    1. Continuing business success through:
      • growth (can be revenue/sales, profits, employees, products/services, customer base)
      • employee satisfaction and retention
    2. Exceptional customer service by continuously striving to exceed customer expectations, and by delivering high standards of service with creativity and innovation.
    3. An on-going commitment to quality through employee motivation, quality processes, employee education and management involvement.
  • Business of the Year Award: 16+ Employees

    Applicants in this category must demonstrate:

    1. Continuing business success through:
      • growth (can be revenue/sales, profits, employees, products/services, customer base)
      • employee satisfaction and retention
    1. Exceptional customer service by continuously striving to exceed customer expectations, and by delivering high standards of service with creativity and innovation.
    2. An on-going commitment to quality through employee motivation, quality processes, employee education and management involvement.
  • Not-for-Profit Organization of the Year

    Applicants in this category must demonstrate:

    1. The organization’s commitment to its clients
    2. How the organization has contributed to the community
    3. How the organization supports employee growth and development and contributes to their well-being, satisfaction and motivation
    4. How the organization motivates, rewards and recognizes its volunteers
  • Contribution to the Community Award

    Applicants in this category must demonstrate:

    1. How the business has ‘given back’ to the community through corporate sponsorship (i.e. cash donations, contributions of services, goods or materials, in-kind).
    2. The types of events the business has supported over the past year (i.e. community activities, festivals, events, sporting events or teams, cultural events, social initiatives)
    3. How the business provides mentorship and leadership in encouraging and facilitating community pride and spirit amongst staff while both at work and away from the work environment.
  • Green Business of the Year Award

    Applicants in this category must demonstrate:

    1. A long-term commitment to environmental sustainability through leadership and the integration of environmentally responsible practices into culture of their business
    2. Key “green” projects that have been implemented in the business and how they have been tracked and measured
    3. How the company engages stakeholders and/or clients and/or the community in activities that support environmental sustainability.
  • Entrepreneurial Spirit Award

    Applicants in this category must demonstrate:

    1. Personal efforts to establish or expand the business
    2. An innovative product or a valuable new service, or one which has adapted and improved a current product or service to keep pace with the times and the needs of its clients
    3. A commitment to continuous improvement and growth
  • New Business Award

    Applicants in this category must demonstrate:

    1. Being in business for two years or less
    2. Significant growth and a plan for continued growth
    3. A commitment to providing a high quality product or service
    4. Excellent customer service
  • Employer of the Year Award

    Applicants in this category must demonstrate:

    1. A workplace culture reflecting the importance of work/life balance
    2. A commitment to providing a healthy and safe work environment
    3. A commitment to providing on-going training and/or professional development opportunities
    4. A positive workplace culture encouraging respect and engaged employees
  • New Product or Service (Existing Business) Award

    Applicants in this category must demonstrate:

    1. The development or introduction of a new product or service between January and December 2016
    2. The innovative nature of the new product or service
    3. The usefulness of the new product or service
    4. The actual or potential benefit of the new product or service
  • Outstanding Customer Service Award

    Applicants in this category must demonstrate:

    1. How their customer service strategy contributes to an exceptional customer experience with positive reviews or recognition
    2. How their customer service strategy encourages customer loyalty
    3. How their customer service strategy has resulted in a more motivated and engaged staff
    4. How their customer service strategy has improved operational excellence

Nominate Your Choice Now!

Thank you for your nominations. Nominations are now being reviewed. Sept 8th, 2017

It Takes a Region to Raise an Economy – Part 2 of 3

Last month I discussed the strategy of growing the economy by attracting more people to live in an area and suggested the most desirable groups to target based on their ability and willingness to contribute to the overall health of a community are baby boomers, entrepreneurial immigrants and millennials. Now we will look at how the quality of place matters in attracting newcomers. (more…)

Economic Growth through Population Growth Part I in a series

There was a significant shift between the old and new economies that occurred between the 1990’s and 2000’s. The old economy is filled with success stories of companies whose road to prosperity began initially by identifying an inexpensive place to do business in a community with preferential zoning and taxation policies and ideally, an established industrial park. People followed the jobs. Manufacturing businesses, largely dependent upon fossil fuels, were responsible for much of the economic growth. (more…)

Shut Up and Listen!

Many years ago I had the privilege to work on a community economic development project with Ernesto Sirolli. Lessons from that project and from his book Ripples from the Zambezi: Passion Entrepreneurship and the Rebirth of Local Economies, have long resonated. His lifelong passion for empowering entrepreneurs is inspirational and instructional when considering how we provide aid or assistance to countries or to people in our own communities. (more…)

The Importance of Community Relations

We wrapped up another successful Tour of Industry at the end of January. The Tour is important for many reasons, one of which is because it strengthens the relationship between businesses and the community.

The business/community relationship is not one-sided. The most obvious benefit for the community is that businesses create jobs. The business and employee tax revenue funds essential government programs such as health, education and infrastructure. We would not enjoy a healthy community absent thriving businesses. The kinds of businesses that locate in our area help establish our community identity and sense of place.

It is difficult to measure the ROI of community investment but businesses that expend their time and financial resources for this purpose stand to reap many benefits when they make it a core focus of their overall business philosophy. Companies who have made this investment report the networking has assisted them to find new markets, customers, and potential investors, they have had an easier time attracting employees and retention rates are higher, their customers view them as being more trustworthy, honest and stable and they experience increased familiarity with their brand. Perhaps most importantly, over time, this investment will increase revenue. With respect to the businesses on the Saanich Peninsula operating internationally, your community members may not be purchasing your product but they will be interested in your opinions, perspectives and expertise and you will benefit from community feedback and support. Competitors can imitate your product or service but they cannot replicate your community.

How can you invest in your community? I have a few suggestions: take out or renew your Chamber membership, sponsor an event, establish an employee volunteer program, participate in our Tour of Industry, nominate your business for a Crystal Award for Business Excellence, support a local charity or share your expertise with new entrepreneurs. Being a good community member is not something that can be done sporadically but rather is something that needs to be done consistently and visibly.

Denny Warner,

Executive Director

Submit Your Questions For the Mayors Breakfast

We are looking for your questions to be asked at the Saanich Peninsula Mayors  Breakfast. The Event is held on March 2nd, 2017 starting 7:30 am  at the Oceans Cafe inside the Institute of Ocean Sciences.

What would you like to hear the Mayors talk about?



 

Embracing Diversity of Opinion

An investment in your local Chamber of Commerce is an investment in your own prosperity, as a businessperson and as a member of the community. Our role is to promote business, monitor all levels of government and champion managed growth in the economy.

As the voice of business, we mobilize like-minded individuals who, together, work to cultivate a community with a healthy, diversified, economy. The events and activities we undertake are a means to achieve that end.

On occasion, we take a position that is unpopular with some of our members. Organizations can experience paralysis and overload when they try to be all things to all people. We, at this Chamber, would rather be seen to be being proactive than to be doing little by attempting only those activities where we had consensus. And so, while it is never comfortable to have members unhappy with our choices, we trust that our purposes remain aligned and we will continue working together to see the Peninsula become the very best place to live, work, and play.

One duty we take very seriously is to continue stimulating passionate discourse on the Saanich Peninsula!

Denny Warner,

Executive Director

Congratulations to our Crystal Award Winners!

Congratulations go out to all our Crystal Award Winners!
This year’s turnout was exceptional and we are happy to present you with the Winners below:

Business of the Year (1-15 Employees)
Coastal Heat Pumps
Business of the Year (16+ Employees)
Seastar Chemicals
Contribution to the Community
Bayshore Home Health
Employer of the Year
Peninsula Co-Op
Entrepreneurial Spirit
Fresh View Events
Green Business of the Year
Level Ground Trading
Lifetime Achievement
Reg Mooney
New Business
Seaside Cabinetry
New Product or Service
EMCS Industries
Newsmaker of the Year
Sidney Gateway Project
Not for Profit Organization of the Year
Growing Young Farmer
Outstanding Customer Service
Bistro Suisse

We would also like to thank our sponsors for their support and participation.

Island SavingsUniversity of Victoria Co-Operative Education Program and Career ServicesHughesman MorrisCamosunSteelhead LNG

 

greenpartydevineNuttycake PhotographyWCGTimes Colonist

 

Business Examiner VictoriaVictoria Airport AuthorityToday's BC LiberalsPeninsula News ReviewPeninsula CO-OP

 

Opportunity Abounds

The reports of the demise of Sidney’s downtown as a result of mall development on the Saanich Peninsula are greatly exaggerated. Why I say that with confidence is because downtown Sidney presently embodies the most important elements of a healthy and prosperous community. Sidney is definitely a changing community, but positively, as living and work spaces are being developed in keeping with a vision that considers how people want to live, engendering a strong sense of place.

Downtown Sidney-by-the-Sea is distinctive from other areas on the Peninsula, indeed from others on Vancouver Island. It is a destination because of its picturesque waterfront area. It is a compact, safe, multifunctional, pedestrian-friendly community, with an interesting mix of businesses. Consideration has been given to the aesthetics and to creating spaces for people to gather and linger. The environmental and natural settings are attractive to residents and create a community where neighbours converse while taking leisurely walks down Beacon and along the seaside waterfront walkway. It also makes Sidney a choice location for day-trippers.

This is very different from the purpose of a mall – a place where people make objective-based shopping decisions. These shoppers want to be in and out quickly and that means creating sizeable parking areas. A mall meets specific needs for shoppers but it cannot compete with the sense of place, of belonging, people seek in a community.

I don’t believe we want downtown Sidney to be good at being a parking lot for shoppers. The Gateway and Sandown developments will create greater economic activity on the Saanich Peninsula and will not necessarily threaten the vibrancy of downtown Sidney if we work together to maximize this opportunity.

 

Denny Warner, Executive Director

Saanich Peninsula Chamber of Commerce